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RESTORING DREAMS

Welcome to Doc's blog

 

See what Doc is up to!

 

Around the shop or on the road meeting new clients and checking out the latest trends in the old car hobby.

 

This is a great place to let us know what you want to see!  Please leave a comment, even if only to say Hi!

 

Doc

By drronaldf20719687, Jun 23 2017 06:36PM

One of the issues we run into way too often, people get taken when buying a classic/collector car. Hidden rust, shoddy repairs, “Dupont” engine rebuilds, and a host of other issues. Unfortunately we end up being the ones to break the bad news that the “Restored” car the buyer paid top dollar for is junk or unsafe to drive.

The classic car hobby is alive and well. Trends are changing from show cars to drivers. Buyers are looking for a cool muscle car or hot rod to drive on the weekends and have fun with it. Maybe finding a car they really liked as a kid. Beware, unscrupulous sellers are counting on the emotions involved in buying a long, sought after car.

Cosmetic repairs, body fill over rust, quick paint of the frame and suspension to hide the rust through. Paint the engine and change the oil “Dupont” Rebuild. A little stop leak and they are ready to sell.

These sellers look at the TV auctions and the prices paid and claim to be giving you a deal. “This car sold on TV for $45,000, but it’s a steal for you at only $38,000.” Knowing it will take $20,000+ to get it into the same condition as that one that sold on TV.

We have experience in buying and evaluating classic cars. We offer this experience to you.

If you are in the market, let us know. We would be more than happy to check it out for you. We know what to look for and where to look. We can give you a very accurate price range for the actual condition of the car. Give us a call. For a small fee, you can be more confident you got what you paid for and not get taken.

And, if you are looking to sell, we can go through the car and “Certify” its actual condition. Give the prospective buyer a little assurance, and get a better price.

Poor Rust Repair
Poor Rust Repair
Hidden Rust
Hidden Rust
"Rebuilt" Engine
"Rebuilt" Engine

By drronaldf20719687, May 7 2016 03:10AM

Since I last posted, things have really picked up nicely. The new paint booth finally got up and running in mid April. The first car in was the 1968 Impala Convertible that had been in an accident.

What a difference in quality and reduced time having a modern booth makes. No dirt in the paint, plenty of light to actually see what you are doing. Granted, we did some fantastic work before, now our quality took an even bigger jump upward.

Since the paint shop is in a completely separate building across the street, running between the shops is not very efficient. To speed things up, we have hired 3 more craftsmen!

We have completed the Impala, did some motor work on a beautiful 68 Camaro, built engines for a 59 Biscayne (348 Tri Power), V8 in a 94 S10, Installed a rebuilt motor into a 63 Buick Wildcat, tuned up an 85 Porsche, started tearing apart Goldie the 1951 School Bus, primed the 27 Coupe, built a motor and transmission for an 81 Camaro. At one point last month we had projects going on for 13 different cars!

This month we plan to get the 27 coupe, 94 S10, 59 Biscayne and 51 School bus completed. We have a 65 Pontiac Convertible and 72 GMC waiting for complete restorations and other paint and custom projects.

1968 Chevrolet Impala Convertible in Primer
1968 Chevrolet Impala Convertible in Primer
1968 Chevrolet Impala Convertible Assembly
1968 Chevrolet Impala Convertible Assembly
1968 Chevrolet Impala Convertible Custom Paint Blacked out Chrome
1968 Chevrolet Impala Convertible Custom Paint Blacked out Chrome
Reflection of Quality
Reflection of Quality
1927 Chevrolet Capitol Coupe in Primer
1927 Chevrolet Capitol Coupe in Primer
1958 Chevrolet 348 Tri Power in 59 Biscayne
1958 Chevrolet 348 Tri Power in 59 Biscayne

By drronaldf20719687, Feb 15 2016 08:00PM

When I started this business, I was experienced in only working on Chevrolet cars and trucks. It is what I drove and what I enjoyed working on. As such, I began the business doing Chevys only.

Things change.

I was very fortunate to find the craftsmen I did to work for me. Roger and Jordan are very skilled and very knowledgeable on many cars and trucks.

Roger had been at a local restoration shop that only did Ferraris. He has built Chevys, Buicks, Dodges, Porsches, Mercedes, Fords, motorcycles and even a couple boats. Roger has over 25 years of experience and it shows in his work.

Jordan, while young, has already owned and worked on a 1923 Chevrolet, Old Lincoln Zephyr, Mercedes, Studebaker and others. He even swapped a Mercedes Diesel engine into his 1985 GMC S15 Jimmy!

It would be a great waste of talent to not work on cars and trucks other than Chevrolet.

So, we have now officially expanded into doing work on all makes and models of cars!

If you have a Ford, Chrysler, AMC, Jeep, GM, Porsche, Mercedes, Ferrari, VW, DeSoto, Packard, whatever; we can restore, repair or customize it for you.

We have already worked on Buick, Pontiac, IHC, GMC, Ford, Dodge, Toyota, and others. This week we are getting a Porsche in for paint and engine work.

Let us know what you have!

By drronaldf20719687, Feb 9 2016 07:49PM

Why our repairs are different than regular repair shops and dealerships.

We started out and continue to be a Restoration Shop for old cars and trucks. We have some of the best automotive craftsmen working here. And these guys can fix just about anything. Restoration work is methodical and exacting. Not something you can just rush through. Every nut and bolt is inspected, cleaned, painted or coated to the way it was originally found on the vehicle when it left the factory. Every bracket and piece of hardware gets the same attention, cleaned, repaired, and painted before it is installed on the car or truck.

When you get into the habit of doing every job like that, it is hard to break.

When we do a repair on a modern car, we do the same thing. All the fasteners, brackets and hardware are cleaned, inspected, painted and lubricated as it was when new before being put back on the car.

Yes, it takes a little longer, but it is worth it. Plus we don’t charge any more than the other guys that don’t do that.

When you need brakes, shocks, belts, hoses, tune-up or any other repair, give us a call. See the difference a Restoration Shop makes.

Of course, if you have a Classic, Vintage, Antique or just an Old Car; this is the only place to go for repair and/or restoration

Previous shop did not use anti seize or clean area before replacing bearing
Previous shop did not use anti seize or clean area before replacing bearing
Parts cleand and properly coated with antiseize
Parts cleand and properly coated with antiseize
Hardware cleaned, parts painted.  Nice repair
Hardware cleaned, parts painted. Nice repair

By drronaldf20719687, Dec 16 2015 07:09PM

Our project 1927 Chevrolet Capital Coupe, along with getting fresh paint, has some drivability issues. Wheel wobble (which will get repaired next) and fuel delivery problems.

In 1927, the fuel pump was vacuum powered. Early cars had the gas tank above the engine and gravity fed the fuel to the carburetor. As technology advanced and for safety reasons, the gas tank was moved to the rear of the car and a pump was required to get the gas to the engine. Most cars today have an electric pump in the gas tank. Not too long ago, a mechanical pump attached to the side of the engine provided the fuel supply.

Like the mechanical pumps, which "sucked" the gas from the tank, then pushed the fuel up to the carburetor; the vacuum pump also "sucked" the gas from the tank. It then served as a mini-tank that gravity fed the engine.

Vacuum is supplied by the engine itself. A tube running from the intake manifold supplies vacuum to the fuel pump. The fuel is sucked into a tank on the pump. Once the tank is full, a float rises and shuts off the vacuum via a valve. Once the vacuum is cut off, another valve opens and allows the gas to flow into a second chamber in the pump. This chamber feeds the carburetor by gravity. As the first chamber empties, the float drops, opening up the vacuum valve to draw more fuel.

This is a simple pump that when clean and well maintained, works great.

The key is to keep it clean.

In our case, old gas and some kind of additive (red in color) literally gummed up the works. The valves would not open and close and no fuel was being drawn to the tank. The owner decided to install an electric fuel pump to bypass the vacuum pump.

Electric pumps can produce very high pressure (great for fuel injection). Remember, this carburetor is normally gravity fed. The high pressure of the electric pump caused flooding and a rich condition.

Our solution, rebuild the vacuum pump and ues the electric pump as an emergency or priming pump.

The vacuum pump was disassembled, cleaned, new flapper valve installed, tested and put back on the car. The car started quickly and ran much better.

Vacuum Pump Bypassed with Electric Pump and Regulator
Vacuum Pump Bypassed with Electric Pump and Regulator
Vacuum Fuel Pump removed from 1927 Chevrolet
Vacuum Fuel Pump removed from 1927 Chevrolet
Vacuum Fuel Pump Tear Down 1927 Chevrolet
Vacuum Fuel Pump Tear Down 1927 Chevrolet
Old Gas Gum and Varnish
Old Gas Gum and Varnish
Inside of Dirty Vacuum Fuel Pump
Inside of Dirty Vacuum Fuel Pump
Cleaned Vacuum Pump Installed 1927 Chevrolet
Cleaned Vacuum Pump Installed 1927 Chevrolet
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