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RESTORING DREAMS

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Around the shop or on the road meeting new clients and checking out the latest trends in the old car hobby.

 

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Doc

By drronaldf20719687, Mar 21 2018 10:52PM

One of the really neat aspects of the auto restoration business, is talking with customers and getting the history behind their car.

Original owners, young married couples buy a car and fix it up years later, a car or truck that has been in the family for years,….

The look in the owner’s eyes as he/she tells the story of when they bought the car brand new, you can feel the excitement all over. Or, when you hear about learning to drive in dad’s old truck, and now they want to restore it so their kids can do the same.

We get the sad stories too. The couple who bought a car and one of the spouses passes before they can fix it up, but still want it done in their memory.

Automobiles, to some, are nothing more than a means to get from point A to point B. While others, their car or truck is a part of the family with the same emotional strings.

It is a great feeling to bring the old memories back and restore their dream. Most of the cars we do are for people like this. They want a piece of the old life back.

Unfortunately, there are times when we cannot bring the car back. Too much rust and deterioration would make the restoration way too costly. It is very difficult sometimes to talk someone out of spending $20, 30, 50,000 on restoring a car that in A1 condition is worth maybe $10,000.

The real question becomes, how much is the enjoyment of driving the old car again worth? For some, that justifies the expense.

As I have posted before, if you plan to keep and enjoy the car, then by all means consider the restoration (keep it in your budget). But if you are looking to sell/flip the car, then leave it as is. You will never recover the amount spent to restore on a quick sale.

1968 Chevelle Rstored Dream
1968 Chevelle Rstored Dream

By drronaldf20719687, Feb 15 2016 08:00PM

When I started this business, I was experienced in only working on Chevrolet cars and trucks. It is what I drove and what I enjoyed working on. As such, I began the business doing Chevys only.

Things change.

I was very fortunate to find the craftsmen I did to work for me. Roger and Jordan are very skilled and very knowledgeable on many cars and trucks.

Roger had been at a local restoration shop that only did Ferraris. He has built Chevys, Buicks, Dodges, Porsches, Mercedes, Fords, motorcycles and even a couple boats. Roger has over 25 years of experience and it shows in his work.

Jordan, while young, has already owned and worked on a 1923 Chevrolet, Old Lincoln Zephyr, Mercedes, Studebaker and others. He even swapped a Mercedes Diesel engine into his 1985 GMC S15 Jimmy!

It would be a great waste of talent to not work on cars and trucks other than Chevrolet.

So, we have now officially expanded into doing work on all makes and models of cars!

If you have a Ford, Chrysler, AMC, Jeep, GM, Porsche, Mercedes, Ferrari, VW, DeSoto, Packard, whatever; we can restore, repair or customize it for you.

We have already worked on Buick, Pontiac, IHC, GMC, Ford, Dodge, Toyota, and others. This week we are getting a Porsche in for paint and engine work.

Let us know what you have!

By drronaldf20719687, Feb 9 2016 07:49PM

Why our repairs are different than regular repair shops and dealerships.

We started out and continue to be a Restoration Shop for old cars and trucks. We have some of the best automotive craftsmen working here. And these guys can fix just about anything. Restoration work is methodical and exacting. Not something you can just rush through. Every nut and bolt is inspected, cleaned, painted or coated to the way it was originally found on the vehicle when it left the factory. Every bracket and piece of hardware gets the same attention, cleaned, repaired, and painted before it is installed on the car or truck.

When you get into the habit of doing every job like that, it is hard to break.

When we do a repair on a modern car, we do the same thing. All the fasteners, brackets and hardware are cleaned, inspected, painted and lubricated as it was when new before being put back on the car.

Yes, it takes a little longer, but it is worth it. Plus we don’t charge any more than the other guys that don’t do that.

When you need brakes, shocks, belts, hoses, tune-up or any other repair, give us a call. See the difference a Restoration Shop makes.

Of course, if you have a Classic, Vintage, Antique or just an Old Car; this is the only place to go for repair and/or restoration

Previous shop did not use anti seize or clean area before replacing bearing
Previous shop did not use anti seize or clean area before replacing bearing
Parts cleand and properly coated with antiseize
Parts cleand and properly coated with antiseize
Hardware cleaned, parts painted.  Nice repair
Hardware cleaned, parts painted. Nice repair

By drronaldf20719687, Dec 16 2015 07:09PM

Our project 1927 Chevrolet Capital Coupe, along with getting fresh paint, has some drivability issues. Wheel wobble (which will get repaired next) and fuel delivery problems.

In 1927, the fuel pump was vacuum powered. Early cars had the gas tank above the engine and gravity fed the fuel to the carburetor. As technology advanced and for safety reasons, the gas tank was moved to the rear of the car and a pump was required to get the gas to the engine. Most cars today have an electric pump in the gas tank. Not too long ago, a mechanical pump attached to the side of the engine provided the fuel supply.

Like the mechanical pumps, which "sucked" the gas from the tank, then pushed the fuel up to the carburetor; the vacuum pump also "sucked" the gas from the tank. It then served as a mini-tank that gravity fed the engine.

Vacuum is supplied by the engine itself. A tube running from the intake manifold supplies vacuum to the fuel pump. The fuel is sucked into a tank on the pump. Once the tank is full, a float rises and shuts off the vacuum via a valve. Once the vacuum is cut off, another valve opens and allows the gas to flow into a second chamber in the pump. This chamber feeds the carburetor by gravity. As the first chamber empties, the float drops, opening up the vacuum valve to draw more fuel.

This is a simple pump that when clean and well maintained, works great.

The key is to keep it clean.

In our case, old gas and some kind of additive (red in color) literally gummed up the works. The valves would not open and close and no fuel was being drawn to the tank. The owner decided to install an electric fuel pump to bypass the vacuum pump.

Electric pumps can produce very high pressure (great for fuel injection). Remember, this carburetor is normally gravity fed. The high pressure of the electric pump caused flooding and a rich condition.

Our solution, rebuild the vacuum pump and ues the electric pump as an emergency or priming pump.

The vacuum pump was disassembled, cleaned, new flapper valve installed, tested and put back on the car. The car started quickly and ran much better.

Vacuum Pump Bypassed with Electric Pump and Regulator
Vacuum Pump Bypassed with Electric Pump and Regulator
Vacuum Fuel Pump removed from 1927 Chevrolet
Vacuum Fuel Pump removed from 1927 Chevrolet
Vacuum Fuel Pump Tear Down 1927 Chevrolet
Vacuum Fuel Pump Tear Down 1927 Chevrolet
Old Gas Gum and Varnish
Old Gas Gum and Varnish
Inside of Dirty Vacuum Fuel Pump
Inside of Dirty Vacuum Fuel Pump
Cleaned Vacuum Pump Installed 1927 Chevrolet
Cleaned Vacuum Pump Installed 1927 Chevrolet

By drronaldf20719687, Oct 29 2015 10:57PM

One of our current projects going on in the shop is a 1927 Chevrolet Capitol Coupe. Very nice car. At the time, it was technologically/mechanically advanced over cars of just a few years prior. Looking at it today, it seems incredibly primative. No front brakes at all (front brakes were not available until 1928) with mechanical external contracting rear brakes.

In 1936 Chevrolet switched to the more modern "Hydraulic" brake system at all 4 wheels.

Doesn't matter what type of brakes you have, we have seen and serviced all of them. Check out the pictures below of the evolution of brakes. Compare the 1927 standard rear brake to the aftermarket multi-piston caliper brakes we installed on a 1966 Chevelle not too long ago.

No Front Brakes
No Front Brakes
External Contracting Mechanical Brake
External Contracting Mechanical Brake
Internal Expanding Drum Brake
Internal Expanding Drum Brake
Multi Piston Disc Brake
Multi Piston Disc Brake
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